OCUK Titan Goliath

As expected, the rig arrived in the retail packaging for the Lancool K62 case with the polystyrene ends preventing any damage during transit. It may seem a pretty obvious point to make but it’s still good to see the Goliath safely packaged: after all a £1000+ rig arriving damaged before being used doesn’t instil oneself with confidence.

In terms of size, the Lancool PC-K62 housed rig is nicely proportioned: the chassis is a little smaller than many competing gaming enclosures but the reduced dimensions haven’t impacted greatly on the spaciousness of the internal layout.

Overclockers UK Titan reviewOverclockers UK Titan review

Overclockers UK Titan reviewOverclockers UK Titan review

As mentioned previously, the customisation available for the Titan Goliath is very impressive with an array of components to be chosen depending on a user’s requirements. The rig we reviewed featured 2 x ATI Radeon HD 5770 1024MB CrossfireX graphics cards, a 1TB Seagate Barracuda 7200.12 and a pre-installed copy of the Windows 7 64-bit OEM operating system.

As a result of these upgrades the starting price of the OCUK Titan Goliath set at £854.99 (inc. VAT) was increased by the order of around £450 to £1294.97. Even with these notable additions, the graphics card and solid state drive options can still be adjusted to optimise performance further.

Overclockers UK Titan reviewOverclockers UK Titan review

OCUK’s work is not completed after simply building the system though. On inspection of the internals of the Lancool chassis, it is obvious that the cable management has been meticulously dealt with. Naturally the aesthetic appeal is heightened as a result but there is a cooling advantage too: by tucking away all loose cables, the airflow produced by system fans is not deflected or blocked and so both intake and exhaust are able to work more effectively.

Overclockers UK Titan reviewOverclockers UK Titan review

The Intel Core i7 920 processor has been moderately overclocked from a stock speed of 2.66GHz to 3.40GHz using a BLCK frequency of 170 with the 20x multiplier. Although this is a reasonable overclock, there is definitely more scope for higher clocks up to about the 4GHz: perhaps OCUK’s reason for only pushing the frequency to 3400MHz is that the CPU cooler is not huge and so more cooling may be required to achieve rock solid stability at higher levels.

Another point, to Overclockers’ credit, is their decision to update many of the components used in the production of the system. Since the launch of Intel’s i7 930 processor (essentially the successor to the 920), the Titan Goliath has used the i7 930 overclocked to 3.60GHz as standard. Moreover, new graphics and hard drive hardware are added to the optional upgrades so as to ensure the Goliath system is always incorporating the latest hardware.

Overclockers UK Titan review

In terms of the noise, the rig is relatively quiet – a low hum is audible but it’s not very loud at all. Indeed, the combination of the Akasa AK-967 Nero HDT processor cooler and blue LED case fans seems to work very effectively.

Overclockers UK Titan reviewOverclockers UK Titan review

Unfortunately, the accessories of components utilised in the rig are not bundled alongside the system which is a little disappointing. If you’re not planning on upgrading the rig or adding extra components down the line, this isn’t a problem. However, small bits and pieces like SATA cables and power supply cabling are very useful to add in extra hard drives or a new graphics card.

Overclockers UK Titan reviewOverclockers UK Titan review

On the whole, the rig looks to be impeccably built without any minor faults to be seen.